Ken Ham believes Bill Nye series will reject true Savior

Creationist and apologist Ken Ham (right) plans to release a two-hour video of Bill Nye visiting the Ark Encounter theme park in Williamstown, Ky. (Courtesy/Ark Encounter)The upcoming Netflix talk show "Bill Nye Saves the World" will likely attack creationism and other matters of faith as damaging to scientific theory and study, apologist and creationist Ken Ham predicted.

"I am sure Bill Nye will see his new TV series as one where he can try to 'save the world' from those biblical creationists that he falsely believes undermine science/technology," Ham told Baptist Press. "I believe he will try to appeal to the millennials in particular that he is going to save the world from creationists. He also wants to save the world from what he believes is the most important issue of the day—climate change."

Ham based his comments on a history of debate and conversation with Nye, most recently during his two-hour July tour of Ham's latest venture, The Ark Encounter theme park in Williamstown, Ky.

"I would say my guess—it is only my guess—is his new series is going to be a big emphasis on climate change and more of a left-wing social agenda," Ham told BP. "In my opinion it will be an anti-creationist, anti-Christian agenda to appeal to the increasing secularism of our day."

Netflix billed the show as a series of episodes tackling topics "from a scientific point of view, dispelling myths and refuting anti-scientific claims that may be espoused by politicians, religious leaders or titans of industry," in its press release announcing the spring 2017 debut.

Widely known as "the science guy" after his 1990s Emmy-winning syndicated "Bill Nye the Science Guy," the author and inventor said he's been on a mission to change the world for decades.

"Today, I'm excited to be working with Netflix on a new show, where we'll discuss the complex scientific issues facing us today, with episodes on vaccinations, genetically modified foods and climate change," Nye said in the Netflix press release. "With the right science and good writing, we'll do our best to enlighten and entertain our audience. And, perhaps we'll change the world a little."

Nye and Ham debated the origin of the world and creation during a widely viewed televised show in 2014 at the Creation Museum, a museum Ham opened in 2007 in Petersburg, Ky., through the Answers in Genesis ministry he founded.

Ham filmed Nye's tour of The Ark Encounter, a life-sized replica of Noah's Ark, and will release the video as "the second debate" in October on YouTube and DVD and as a website download, Ham told BP. He has sent a 30-minute highlight of the debate to supporters.

Since its July 7 opening, the Ark Encounter has exceeded anticipated visits and increased attendance at the nearby Creation Museum by 75 percent, Ham said. Nye's tour was viewed by visitors to the Ark, many of them millennials the show likely will target. The two venues have received more than 380,000 visits since July 7, Ham said.

The title of Nye's show is ironic, Ham agreed, as he likely will lead people astray.

"I think there's some focus on him here, 'I'm going to save the world because I'm going to help people stop climate change … because that's the most pressing problem,'" Ham said. "And of course … our message as Christians is the most pressing problem is man's sin and rebelling against God. And Jesus has already paid the penalty to save us in this world; He's already paid the price for that. And it's Jesus who's going to save those who put their trust in Him, not Bill Nye."

Ham has presented the Gospel to Nye at least four times and offered to be the scientist's friend, Ham told BP, but Nye has refused the message and friendship. Yet Ham remains hopeful that Nye will finally see the truth of God's Word.

"Bill Nye is anti-God. It's very obvious that he puts his trust in man and in secular academia," Ham said. "When you're promoting an anti-God, leftist socialist agenda, to the Christian, there's no value in that. It's going to really lead people astray."

Diana Chandler is Baptist Press' general assignment writer/editor. BP (bpnews.net) reports on missions, ministry and witness advanced through the Cooperative Program and on news related to Southern Baptists' concerns nationally and globally.

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