Easter: Three commands from an empty tomb

 
"The angel said to the women, 'Do not be afraid; for I know that you are looking for Jesus who has been crucified. He is not here, for He has risen, just as He said. Come, see the place where He was lying. Go quickly and tell His disciples that He has risen from the dead; and behold, He is going ahead of you into Galilee, there you will see Him; behold, I have told you'" (Matthew 28:5-7 NASB). Springtime ...

FIRST PERSON: Eagerly looking for His return!

 
"Men of Galilee," said the angels, "why do you stand gazing up into heaven? This same Jesus, who was taken up from you into heaven, will so come in like manner as you saw Him go into heaven" (Acts 1:11). Those words inseparably linked Christ's departure to the moment of His return—the reality of His Ascension and His Second Coming. It behooves us to be watching and waiting, untainted by the world, since Christ may come at any moment. ...

The empty tomb: Archaeology and the ancient record

 
The thought of Jesus stepping out of the tomb on the first Easter morning is simply overwhelming. His atoning death was magnified by the miracle of His resurrection. While the cross remains the undisputed symbol of Christianity, the empty tomb conveys the abundant life found in Christ. Just imagine seeing the empty tomb as it was that day. As a believer, I have experienced the power of Jesus' cross and His empty tomb. I don't need to see the tomb ...

Why the resurrection is always an essential theological concept

 
As a student in a Baptist college I heard in a chapel service that it wasn't important whether Jesus literally and bodily resurrected from the dead. I was told as long as the influence of Jesus lived on in me, that was the important thing. Denying the miraculous was not uncommon in our Baptist institutions almost a half-century ago. For those who get weary of hearing about battles for the Bible, let me remind you that eternal vigilance is necessary ...

Easter: Recalling a computer crash and the resurrection

 
Can you recall your worst academic disaster? I certainly can. I was in my second or third year of my doctor of ministry program at Gateway Seminary (then-Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary) back in the mid-1980s. The D.Min. program at that time was broken into three parts: 1) on-campus seminars—I absolutely loved these. I enjoyed the work and the time spent with my professors and fellow students. 2) The project phase and project report —I found this ...